Posts Tagged ‘Southern Thailand’

Canon 400D catches an old Asian tapir and clouded leopard

Tuesday, January 20, 2015 posted by Bruce 1:20 PM

Southern Thailand’s natural heritage – an odd-toed ungulate and a carnivore

Tapir in Khlong Saeng 5

A mature Asian tapir caught by a Canon 400D trail cam…!

Just returned from Khlong Saeng Wildlife Sanctuary in the south of Thailand and pulled my Canon 400D camera trap. These shots are of an old Asian Tapir and the best ones in this set as shown here. Being odd-toed ungulates and strictly vegetarian, these large herbivorous mammals thrive quite well in this unique ecosystem made up of moist evergreen forest. These unique creatures have been on the planet for about 40 million years. They are the largest of the world’s four species with the other three in South America…!

Tapir in Khlong Saeng 3

 

Tapir in Khlong Saeng 2

Tapir in Khlong Saeng 4

This tapir almost looks pregnant…!

Clouded leopard in Khlong Saeng

A clouded leopard in daylight…!

This cam also caught a clouded leopard but the cat came in a bit low. These cats are not normally out in broad daylight but I guess they do sometimes prowl during the day. That was the trade off for the full-frame tapir shot. This sanctuary is simply amazing and I look forward to future visits…! Enjoy…!

 

 

Comments Off on Canon 400D catches an old Asian tapir and clouded leopard

Nikon D90 catches a rare ‘clouded leopard’…!

Wednesday, October 29, 2014 posted by Bruce 11:07 AM

One of the most beautiful of all the Asian wild cats

Clouded Leopard in Khlong Saeng

Once upon a time, the clouded leopard (Neofelis nebulosa) was found all over Thailand when some 75 percent of the country was covered in forest. At the end of WWII, the human population really began to explode and these magnificent biospheres were cut down for agriculture and settlement taking all the natural resources in its wake. Modern transportation, weapons and logging on a grand scale began to quickly shrink this once remarkable heritage.

Barely 20 percent forest cover is now surviving in an ever-shrinking wilderness. The clouded leopard has been exterminated primarily for its pelt and now survives in all but a few protected areas throughout the Kingdom. It is one of the most beautiful marked creatures in the world. The marbled cat (Pardofelis marmorata), another wild feline is similar in coat pattern but smaller in size. Both of these cats have become extremely rare throughout their range.

In July of this year, I decided to make a trip down to Khlong Saeng Wildlife Sanctuary in southern Thailand in conjunction with Greg McCann and Habitat I.D. (NGO to monitor wildlife in Southeast Asia) to set some camera traps in the moist evergreen forest to see what was still thriving here. Three years ago, I did a camera trap and photographic survey of this protected area and got a marbled cat up on a ridgeline in the interior, plus a clouded leopard in a cave entrance at another location. I knew there was still good possibilities that I would get these cats again.

I decided to set my Nikon D90 DSLR trail cam along with a couple Bushnell Trophy Cams at this same location. Unfortunately, the hard-wired slave flashes were not working due to wiring problems and so left the cam with its single hot-shoe mounted Nikon SB-400 flash. I knew then if the cam caught any creature, I would get images with ‘eye-shine’ but decided to leave it anyway.

I have just returned from Khlong Saeng to collect the data from these cams. Imagine my surprise to see a clouded leopard on the D90’s card. It was an absolute joy to see this cat had passed the cam and even though the ‘eye-shine’ was there, the markings and beauty of this carnivore is truly remarkable. I have pulled the D90 and put a Canon 400D with three Nikon SB-28 slaves which was working very well when I left it. The Bushnell cams also recorded many other species and I will be doing a video post soon. Enjoy…!

Comments Off on Nikon D90 catches a rare ‘clouded leopard’…!
http://2translators.net/age-114750/ Treatment for uterine fibroids it is important to note that since fibroids are not cancerous, no treatment at all is probably the best option for women who have no symptoms associated with the fibroids. Fibroids tend to grow during the reproductive years when hormone activity... eriktonnesen.com/rqy-112200/ Fibroids tend to grow during the reproductive years when hormone activity... cheap viagra uk next day delivery Fibroids, found in approximately 4% of pregnant women, are associated with an increased risk of pregnancy complications. how long after taking viagra does it take effect The temperature must be lower than -20~50degc to completely destroy tissue. Jumpropeworkout. From there, a very small nick in the groin area will be made, through which a narrow catheter is inserted. Dr. http://prostylingtiling.com.au/lok-114439/ These include infection, early menopause , and pain that in rare cases could last for months. talleresmichel.es/fyv-111094/